Jason C. Bartz, PhD

Jason C. Bartz, PhD

Jason C. Bartz, PhD

Professor
Associate Dean, Academic and Faculty Affairs
Vice Chair, Medical Microbiology and Immunology
School of Medicine, Omaha Campus

Expertise/Specializations

  • Prion disease

Academic Appointments

Department

  • Med. Microbiology & Immunology

Position

  • Professor

Secondary Appointment

  • Pharmacology and Neuroscience

Biography

Examples of the most recent publications can be obtained from this PubMed link
 

Publications and Presentations

Articles

  • , 5(5)
  • , 1-11
  • , 295(30), 1042010433
  • , Oct 9;4(5), e00630-19
  • , Mar 29;294(13), 4911-4923
  • , Jan 24;14, 497-516
  • , Oct 18;14(10), e1007323
  • , Jun 1;166, 98-107
  • , Mar 28;92(8), pii: e02191-17
  • , Mar 4;12(2), 73-82
  • , pp. 69-84
  • , Dec 1;199(11):, 3821-3827
  • , pp. 31-44
  • , Mar 29;13(3):, e1006298
  • , 90 (18), 8293-8301
  • , Jan 31;114(5, 1141-1146
  • , 12 (7), e1005543
  • , 90 (12), 5715-5723
  • , 10.1371, 0141282
  • , 10 (10), e0117935
  • , 89 (14), 7421-7424
  • , Jul;89(14), 7421-4
  • , 5th Edition, 1165-1186
  • , 10(2)
  • , 11(2)
  • , 8(6), 415-420
  • , Nov 1;8(11):e80203. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0080203
  • , 79, 13794-13796
  • , 99 (11), 2161-2183
  • , 79, 11858-11863
  • , 78, 6792-6798
  • , 85, 265-273
  • , 77, 583-591

Publications

Presentations

Research and Scholarship

Research and Scholarship Interests

  • Prion diseases are a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases that affect humans (e.g. Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease) and animals (e.g. chronic wasting disease). Prion diseases have long subclinical incubation periods of months to decades with a short clinical phase that is characterized by the onset of behavioral, cognitive or motor deficits. Deposition of the abnormal isoform of the prion protein, PrPSc is pathognomonic for prion diseases and its deposition in the central nervous system (CNS) results in neuronal loss and onset of clinical symptoms. PrPSc is an amyloid protein that is resistant to proteolytic degradation and is postranslationally derived from the protease sensitive non-amyloid host encoded prion protein, PrPC. Outside of the CNS, PrPSc deposition occurs in the peripheral nervous system and secondary lymphoreticular system (LRS) tissues such as spleen and lymph nodes. All prion diseases of animals and a majority of prion diseases in humans are due to prion exposure by a peripheral route (e.g. ingestion). Details of the mechanism(s) of prion transport to the CNS are poorly understood. To better define prion transport to the CNS my lab is investigating three areas of prion pathogenesis. First, we are exploring alternative routes of prion entry into the host in an attempt to better define the possible routes that prions can gain access to the CNS. Second, we are investigating the role of the innate immune system in processing and transport of prions to secondary LRS tissues. Finally, we are interested in factors that influence susceptibility of neurons to prion infection and/or replication. The understanding of routes and mechanisms of prion transport will enhance the future development of therapeutic interventions to prevent prion spread to the CNS.

Current Research Projects

Awards and Honors

  • University Research Award, Creighton University , 2019
  • Young Investigator Award, Creighton University, 2005
  • Richard F. Marsh Award for Outstanding Graduate Student Research, University of Wisconsin, 1998